The heart is enigmatic, love is odd: But what is death and heartbreak if not brutality?

On Sundays, my favorite thing to do is to stay in bed, with or without food, but mostly without food until I have to get up and prepare for another week of lack of sleep and a constant state of exhaustion. Even though I would rather sleep, my brain works in a different way; so an open eye usually communicates “hey, I think I am done sleeping now”. I stay for hours scrolling on Twitter and juggling through apps. …


On the night before the elections, I could not sleep. I had no business in the outcome or in what would transpire the next day — my sister was the one voting for the first time — but my mother made sure that I understood the importance of this election and that I was lucky enough to witness it. So on my dry raffia bed, facing the window that opened a view down the quiet, drenched road, I starred and imagined how tomorrow could go. I thought about the tall, strong faced man next door who my mother said his…


This is an interview series with women in The Gambia or in the diaspora on what it means to them to be part of a community/network of feminists that show solidarity, support, and create networks for more advocacy and reach both online and offline. The main aim is to show how the advocacy spectrum in The Gambia can be difficult to penetrate based on disabilities, identities, networks, and experience or lack thereof in activism.

This is the first article in the series with Sira, a Gambian feminist, deaf, non-sign language literate woman, and a free radical.

Maimuna: Hello Sira, can…


Image by jrhode on Creative Commons under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Hi, it’s a new week, not entirely new with the Afro Bloggers #WinterABC2020 Writing Challenge because as we left last week’s, we are also going into the new week reflecting. Today’s prompt is “4 things I have learned on social media” and as someone who is constantly on her computer or laptop, I might have a little more than four to share — I am writing this while (not completely) disconnected from social media.

I am a great advocate for the good things that social media offers as opposed to how some people see this new innovation as a ‘destructive”…


Me, in my Feminist Theory Class with my students. Just kidding, I was feministing on bahama grass with a sea view

*screaming* I (We) made it to Day five of the #AfroBloggers WinterABC 2020 writing challenge and I am honestly so proud of myself for coming this far. One thing I have realized is the constant rush of creativity attracting me, and I have also decided to finish a long-overdue project. So watch out for that even beyond this challenge by keeping in touch with me.

Another thing I have also learned in the last four days is how much important content is, and even though consistency is not an easy-to-do thing, it becomes way easier to create and produce once…


I knew from the first day when I read the topics that today’s challenge will be the most difficult. I struggle to write, say, or even acknowledge within anything that has to do with me -mostly the good stuff. I am still contemplating if I will be writing this or not, but if I do, I know it will be far from all the good stuff.

To Ya Sally, Fanta, and Usman, for being memories of bedtime stories for my kids

To My Mom and Dad, for being breakable bonds that still brought love and care to our lives

Finally…


It’s day three of the #AfroBloggers challenge and to be honest with you, I did not feel like posting today. I thought just maybe if I have posted two days in a row, that was enough for a commitment. Also partly because there have been constant power cuts and I have gotten so much used to writing on Google Docs (huge shout out to the working offline feature).Then something just said “hey, I think you should just do it” and I think that it is the voice of Plasas reminding me that today’s topic is “Of Your Favorite Local Food”.


Oh here you are. Welcome to Day 2 of the #WinterABC2020 Writing Challenge for African bloggers, I also might be doing better than I thought I would. The topic for today is why do you blog, basically the purpose of your blog.

So let’s get started …

If I were you, I would not read my first blog post. Until recently I still go back to it to edit because of how terrible it was. On the other hand, that post is an amalgamation of the truest words I have ever written. I remember how someone read it and said…


Image by Emma Smart on Flickr

I am committing to 22 days of words to pour myself out there as an escape from this world and all that is going on right now. I am also doing this with three posts sitting in my draft and pending public demands of part two to a story I wrote last year. I have a friend who thinks that I love being tired, but if you understand my daily schedule and constant rush to get a task done and add more to it, you will not argue with him. …


Illustration of Internet Netzwerke from Flickr

Up until the afternoon of March 17, The Gambia had not recorded a case of Coronavirus even with our bordering country, Senegal, being on its 24th case at that time. However, this took a turn on the evening of March 17 when the President of The Republic of The Gambia, Adama Barrow appeared on the national broadcaster to announce measures that the government will take to avoid an outbreak in The Gambia. Some of these measures included the closure of all schools, suspension of all travels of public officials and workshops, both national and international as well as public gatherings…

KorrJorr Jeng

SHATTERED CHOICES AND STAINED VEILS. CROSSING PATHS OF ISLAM, WOMEN AND SOCIETY.

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